Stuttering: A Neurodevelopmental Motor Control Disorder The phenomenology of stuttering seems most commensurate with a neurologically based developmental motor control disorder (Brin, Blitzer, & Stewart, 1998; Kiziltan & Akalin, 1996), There are similarities and differences between stuttering and spasmodic dysphonia, an idiopathic focal dystonia that is a task specific speech motor control disorder. Although the ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2002
Stuttering: A Neurodevelopmental Motor Control Disorder
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christy L. Ludlow
    Laryngeal and Speech Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2002
Stuttering: A Neurodevelopmental Motor Control Disorder
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2002, Vol. 12, 8-10. doi:10.1044/ffd12.2.8
SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders, August 2002, Vol. 12, 8-10. doi:10.1044/ffd12.2.8
The phenomenology of stuttering seems most commensurate with a neurologically based developmental motor control disorder (Brin, Blitzer, & Stewart, 1998; Kiziltan & Akalin, 1996), There are similarities and differences between stuttering and spasmodic dysphonia, an idiopathic focal dystonia that is a task specific speech motor control disorder. Although the pathophysiologies of these two disorders are similar, the etiology and pathogenesis differ.
The period of vulnerability for developing stuttering is between 2 years of age and puberty. In our research subjects, the age of onset tends to be earlier in familial cases. Over 60% of those with a family history report onset before 5 years of age, while among those without a familial history, the onset age tends to be later with 40% having their onset before 5 and another 40% between 5 and 8 years of age. In both groups less than 10 % of cases had onset between 9 and 15 years of age. Similar differences in age of onset between familial and sporadic cases also occurs in torsion dystonia (Brin et al., 1998).
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 4 Perspectives on Fluency and Fluency Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.